Java Earthquake; Hurricane Hector and Hawai’i

A major earthquake hit the tourist areas of Java and Bali yesterday, leaving dozens if not hundreds dead, thousands homeless, and chaos in many areas.

Economic impacts are likely to be between $2 and $3 Billion dollars – major damage and a big hit for the local economy.  This is likely to be an ongoing disaster, and as usual one the US media will lose interest in once the tourists are evacuated.

Meanwhile in the central pacific, Hurricane Hector is on track to pass south of the big island of Hawai’i.  If it stays on track, while rain and gusty winds are possible not likely to cause much damage aside from the occasional tree down.  A rightward wobble could made things worse – and given the ongoing eruptions, folks there might be consulting the sages as to which gods they have offended …

Tropical Update, Saturday 2 June 2018

Only one actual system, in the South China Sea heading passing the west side of Hainan Island on Tuesday, then slowing down a lot and approaching the Guangxi coast by Thursday.  The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast has it becoming a tropical storm  by that time; on that track impacts are on the order of $25 Million, but a wobble or intensity increase makes that estimate pretty much useless at this point …

Elsewhere is quiet.  Might get something in the East Pacific (off Mexico) next week.  A few scattered earthquakes, all below magnitude 6.  The Kilauea volcano in Hawai’i is still active, with one fountain still spraying lava over 100 feet in the air, down from 260 feet a few days ago.  Think about how much power it takes to jet water a few hundred feet, much less hot molten rock …